The National Initiatives Meeting – genomics around the globe

Three years after the launch of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) and six months after the first GA4GH-hosted convention of national genomics initiatives, Kathryn North (Australian Genomics) and Genomics England’s Chief Scientist, Professor Mark Caulfield recently convened representatives from 13 National Initiatives in genomic data collection to discuss areas of potential collaboration at the Wellcome Trust in London.

The goal of the meeting was to identify potential areas of collaboration,

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Rare Disease Day 2017

Today (February 28th) is Rare Disease Day.

Rare disease is a deceptive term. There are 6,000 to 8,000 different rare diseases. So although each one is rare, as a group they are common. So much so, that 1 person in 17, or 7% of people are affected by a rare disease.

About 80% of rare diseases have a genetic cause. The cause is often a single changed ‘letter’ amongst the 3.2 billion letters of DNA that make up the human genome.

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UK Prime Minister Opens New Sequencing Centre

Mike Stratton, Sir John Chisholm, Theresa May, David Bentley, Heidi Allen MP

Today (21st November) Genomics England, Illumina, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute hosted the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, at the opening of the Bridget Ogilvie Building on the Wellcome Genome Campus in Cambridge. This is where DNA sequencing for the 100,000 Genomes Project takes place.

It is also the site where the UK’s contribution to the original Human Genome Project took place over 15 years ago. The campus is now home to some of the world’s foremost institutes and organisations in genomics.

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The 100,000 Genomes Project features in London’s Science Museum

The Science Museum’s Our Lives in Data exhibition highlights the technology revolution that will impact our lives.

More information about our lives is being captured than ever before, and as the amount of data collected grows so does the debate around data ownership.

The Science Museum’s newest exhibition, Our Lives in Data, will uncover some of the diverse ways our data is being collected, analysed and used.

A person’s full DNA sequence – their genome – generates around 200GB of data.

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New partnership with British Science Association as part of British Science Week

Future Debates BSA

To mark British Science Week (11-20th March), Genomics England is pleased to announce a partnership with the British Science Association (BSA).

Over the next few months, Genomics England and the BSA will be working together to run a series of Future Debates in the summer, as well as publishing a social intelligence report in the late spring.

Genomics England want to showcase the potential benefits whole genome sequencing can offer patients,

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Rare Disease Day 2016

Rare Disease Day logo

Our clinical lead for rare disease, Dr Richard Scott, gives an update on our work. February 29th 2016 is Rare Disease Day.

Rare disease is a deceptive term. There are 6,000 to 8,000 different rare diseases. This means that although each one is rare, as a group they are common. So much so, that 1 person in 17 is affected with a rare disease. That is 7%.

Until recently,

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Launch of Genomic Medicine Seminar Series

Last week (11th June) we launched our seminar series in Genomic Medicine. We have invited speakers from around the world to come and talk about their experiences of genomic medicine. The talks are designed for clinicians and researchers involved in the 100,000 Genomes Project.

The first speaker was Professor Madhuri Hegde from Emory University, USA. Watch her talk below.

The details of the next event will be announced here soon.

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