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The Participant Panel

The Participant Panel is a key advisory group for Genomics England, working to ensure that the voices of patients, their families, and their experiences inform our work.

Rebecca Middleton at Genomics England Innovation Showcase talking on panel about newborns

Joining the panel

What we do

The Panel plays a vital role in ensuring the interests of participants are always at the centre of everything Genomics England does. Panel members help to guide and advise Genomics England and how genomic medicine is used in the NHS.

Who can join?

Anyone who has taken part in the 100,000 Genomes Project, the GenOMICC COVID-19 study, or has had a genomic test via the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, whose data is held in the National Genomic Research Library can apply to join the Panel. Carers of those who have taken part are also welcome.

What does it involve?

The Panel meets four times a year for a day-long session. There are usually documents to read or consider before these meetings, as well as some follow-up work afterwards. Some panel members also sit on other committees within Genomics England and will therefore need to attend those extra meetings. Opportunities also arise to participate in working groups, although these are optional.

How to apply

Please email us – including 'Participant Panel' in your subject line – if you are interested in joining the Participant Panel. In your email, please outline why you are interested in this role, and include your name and contact details.

Contact the Panel

Please email us – including 'Participant Panel' in your subject line – if you are interested in joining the Participant Panel or have any questions about its work.

If you're expressing interest in joining the Panel, please outline why you are interested in this role, and include your name and contact details.

Please note: applicants must have direct experience of consenting to take part in genomics research, either as a patient or carer of someone offered whole genome sequencing via the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, the GenOMICC study, or as a participant in the 100,000 Genomes Project.

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